Asbestosis Situation and Severity in the Era of COVID-19 Pandemic : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Asbestosis  Situation  and  Severity  in  the  Era  of  COVID-19  Pandemic : A  Systematic  Review  and  Meta-Analysis

Ruangrong Cheepsattayakorn1,  Attapon Cheepsattayakorn 2,3,4,5*,   Porntep Siriwanarangsun 3

1. Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

2. Faculty  of  Medicine  Vajira  Hospital, Navamindradhiraj, Bangkok, Thailand

3. Faculty of Medicine, Western University, Pathumtani Province, Thailand.

4. 10th Zonal Tuberculosis and Chest Disease Center, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

5. Department  of  Disease  Control, Ministry  of  Public  Health, Thailand.

Correspondence to: Attapon  Cheepsattayakorn, 10th  Zonal  Tuberculosis  and  Chest  Disease  Center, 143  Sridornchai  Road  Changklan  Muang  Chiang  Mai  50100  Thailand Tel : 66  53  140767 ; 66  53  276364 ; Fax : 66  53  140773 ; 66  53  273590 ; Email :  Attapon1958@gmail.com.


Copyright

© 2024 Attapon  Cheepsattayakorn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Received: 13 February 2024

Published: 27 February 2024


Abstract

A   comprehensive  search  was  carried  out  in  mainstream  bibliographic  databases  or  Medical  Subject  Headings, including  ScienDirect, PubMed, Scopus, and  ISI  Web  of  Science.  The  search  was  applied  to  the  articles  that  were  published  between  2003  and  early  2024.   With  strict  literature  search  and  screening  processes, it  yielded  3  articles  from  64  articles  of  initial  literature  database.  Asbestos, a  heterogenous  group  of  hydrated  magnesium  silicate  minerals  with  a  tendency  of  fiber  separation.  Asbestos-associated  pleural  fibrosis (pleural  plaque  or  diffuse  plural  fibrosis), pleural  thickening, or  asbestosis  are  the  majority  of  nonmalignant-asbestos-associated-disease  conditions.  Nevertheless, there  is  close  association  between  of  the  nonmalignant-disease  presence  and  the  malignancy  risk, particularly, lung  cancer (complicated  with  pleural  or  peritoneal  mesothelioma  and  cigarette  smoking).  One  of  search  study  clearly  demonstrated  rising  trend  of  mortality  in  people  aged  80  years  and  older  among  the  three  search  studies, whereas  COVID-19  pneumonia  patients  requiring  respiratory  support  were  higher  among  patients  with  history  of  asbestos  exposure  or  asbestosis, compared  to  unexposed-asbestos  patients (p = 0.015).  

In  conclusion, The  detection  of  an  independent  relation  in  small  sample  of  subjects  may  be  precluded  by  confounding  covariables, such  as  smokers, having  more  comorbidity, more  frequently  male, and  older  age.  In  occupational  asbestos  exposure, respiratory  support  was  required  higher, compared  to  unexposed-asbestos  patients.  Proactive  and cooperative  participation  can  protect  people  with  asbestos  exposure  from  COVID-19  comorbidity.                                    

Keywords:   asbestos, asbestosis, COVID-19, situation, severity, exposure, SARS-CoV-2


Asbestosis Situation and Severity in the Era of COVID-19 Pandemic : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Abbreviations :  COVID-19 : Coronavirus-2019, FEV1 :  Forced  Expiratory  Volume  in  one  second, FVC:  Forced  Vital  Capacity, ILDs : Interstitial  Lung  Diseases, IPF : Idiopathic  Pulmonary  Fibrosis, p : Probability, SARS-CoV-2 : Severe  Acute  Respiratory  Syndrome-Coronavirus-type 2, US :  United  States, USA :  United  States  of  America

 

Objectives  of  the  Study 

The  objectives  of  this  study  are  to  identify  the  better  understanding  on  the  situation  and  severity  of  asbestosis  and  asbestos  exposure  in  the  era  of  COVID-19  pandemic.

 

Introduction

Asbestos, a  heterogenous  group  of  hydrated  magnesium  silicate  minerals  with  a  tendency  of  fiber  separation [1].  Asbestos-associated  pleural  fibrosis (pleural  plaque  or  diffuse  plural  fibrosis), pleural  thickening, or  asbestosis  are  the  majority  of  nonmalignant-asbestos-associated-disease  conditions [1].  Nevertheless, there  is  close  association  between  of  the  nonmalignant-disease  presence  and  the  malignancy  risk, particularly, lung  cancer (complicated  with  pleural  or  peritoneal  mesothelioma  and  cigarette  smoking) [1].  Without  obvious  clinical  signs  of  nonmalignant  asbestos-associated  diseases, increased  personal  cancer  risk  with  prolonged  asbestos  exposure  can  be  occurred, implying  a  lifelong  increased  asbestos-associated-cancer  risk [1].  From  the  general  diagnostic-asbestosis  criteria  established  in  1986, they  were  slightly  modified  as  the  following : 1) evidence  of  structural pathology  consistent  with  asbestos-associated  disease  as  evidenced  by  histology  or  imaging; 2 evidence  of  causation  by  asbestos  as  documented  by  the  environmental  and  occupational  history, exposure  markers (majority  of  pleural  plaques), and  recovery  of  asbestos  bodies, or  other  means; and  3) exclusion  of  alternative  plausible  causes  for  the  findings [1].  It  was  noticed  that  during  COVID-19  pandemic, chronic-lung-disease  patients  with  comorbidities  had  tendency  to  have  more  severe  COVID-19  and  more  complications [2].  Interstitial  lung  diseases (ILDs)  can  result  from  drug, environmental, or  occupational  exposures  and  can  be  manifested  in  an  underlying  systemic  diseases [2], especially, idiopathic  pulmonary  fibrosis (IPF)  is  related  to  viral  infections  and  thoracic  surgical  procedures  with  acute  exacerbation  and  high  mortality  rates  of  35 %-70 % [3].   Approximately, 1.4 %  of  global  prevalence  of  ILDs  among  global  COVID-19  patients  was  seen [4].  ILD  patients  with  non-survival  COVID-19  had  high  mortality  rates (two  times), compared  with  non-ILDs [4].   In  idiopathic  pulmonary  fibrosis (IPF), the  fibroblastic  foci  are  characterized, but  are  infrequent  in  asbestosis [5].  Whereas  mild  fibrosis  of  the  visceral  pleura  is  commonly  accompanied  in  asbestosis, this  feature  is  rare  in  IPF [5].  Very  little  inflammation  is  identified  in  interstitial  fibrosis  of  asbestosis  whereas  it  is  better  found  in  IPF [5].           


Methods  of  the  Study 

Search  Strategy  and  Inclusion  Criteria

A   comprehensive  search  was  carried  out  in  mainstream  bibliographic  databases  or  Medical  Subject  Headings, including  ScienDirect, PubMed, Scopus, and  ISI  Web  of  Science.  The  search  was  applied  to  the  articles  that  were  published  between  2003  and  early  2024.  Our  first  involved  performing  searches  of  article  abstract/keywords/title  using  strings  of  [(“ Asbestos ”  or  “ Asbestosis ”,  “ SARS-CoV-2 ”  or  “ COVID-19 ”  and  “ Severity ”  or  “ Exposure ”, “ Plaque ”  or  “ Pleural  Thickening  ”  or  “ Pleural Calcification ”, “ Peritoneal  Plaque  ”  or “ Peritoneal  Calcification ”, “ Calcified  Peritoneum ”)].  After  a  first  approach  of  search, published  articles  focusing  on  asbestos-associated  diseases  or  asbestosis  were  retained  and  the  information  on  situation  and  severity  and  COVID-19  or  SARS-CoV-2  comorbidity  and  severity  was  extracted  for  having  a  crude  knowledge  involving  their  themes.  Another  round  of  publication  search  was  conducted  for  adding  the  missing  published  articles  that  were  not  identified  by  the  first  round. 

All  keywords  combinations  from  one  asbestos-associated  disease  type  and  COVID-19  or  SARS-CoV-2  variables  to  bind  the  population  of  cases  under  consideration.  Search  string  for  asbestos-associated  diseases  included  [ “ Pleural  Plaque”  or  “ Pleural  Thickening ”  or  “ Pleural  Calcification ”  or  “ Peritoneal  Plaque ”  or  “  Peritoneal  Calcification ”  or  “ Lung  Cancer ”  or  “  Nonmalignant  asbestos-associated  disease  ”  or  “  Interstitial-Lung-Disease-Associated  Asbestos  Exposure  ” or  “ Occupational  Asbestos  Exposure ”  or  “ Environmental  Asbestos  Exposure ” ].  The  initial  literature  databases  were  further  manually  screened  with  the  following  rules : 1) non-asbestos-exposure-associated-disease-related  articles  were  excluded; 2) articles  that  did  not  report  a  result  of  asbestos-associated  diseases  or  conditions  related  to  COVID-19  exposure  or  comorbidity  were  not  considered, such  as  commentary  articles, or  editorial; 3) non-peer  reviewed  articles  were  not  considered  to  be  of  a  scholarly  trustworthy  validity; and  4) duplicated  and  non-English  articles  were  removed.  The  articles  were  carefully  selected  to  guarantee  the  literature  quality, which  is  a  trade-off  for  quantity. 

With  strict  literature  search  and  screening  processes, it  yielded  3  articles  from  64  articles  of  initial  literature  database.  Needed  article  information  was  extracted  from  each  article  by : 1) direct  information  including  journal, title, authors, abstract, full  text  documents  of  candidate  studies, publishing  year; 2) place  name  of  the  study  area; 3) study  period; 4) research  method  used; 5) types  of  asbestos  variables  studied; 6)  types  of  asbestos  exposure  studied; 7) COVID-19  or  SARS-CoV-2  comorbidity  and  situation; and 7) the  conclusions  made  about  the  impacts  of  asbestos-associated  diseases  or  conditions  related  to  COVID-19  or  SARS-CoV-2  comorbidity  and  situation.  An  overview  of  the  information  required  for  the  present  analysis  that  was  captured  by  those  themes  was  demonstrated  in  the  Figure  1.      

Figure 1: Literature  Search  and  Screening  Flow

 

Results               

Table  1  :  Demonstrating  the  asbestos-associated  diseases  or  conditions  impacted  by  COVID-19  or  SARS-CoV-2  comorbidity  (2021-to  early-2024)

Please click here to view table

 

Discussion 

One  of  the  three  search  studies [6-8]  clearly  demonstrated  rising  trend  of  mortality  in  people  aged  80  years  and  older [6], whereas  COVID-19  pneumonia  patients  requiring  respiratory  support  were  higher  among  patients  with  history  of  asbestos  exposure  or  asbestosis, compared  to  unexposed-asbestos  patients (p = 0.015) [7].  During  and   after  hospitalization, the  association  between  main  studied  variables  and  occupational  asbestos  exposure  demonstrated  significantly  higher  percentage  of  requiring  respiratory-support  patients [7].  Except  for  a  lower  FEV1/FVC  in  asbestos-exposed  patients, no  different  spirometry  parameters  were  detected [7].  Asbestos-exposed  patients  with  COVID-19  comorbidity  presented  more  intense  dyspnea, compared  to  unexposed  patients [7].  In  the  univariate  analysis, asbestos  exposure  was  related  to  severe  COVID-19 [7].  Nevertheless, in  the  logistic  multivariate  regression  analysis, this  hypothesis  could  not  be  confirmed [7].  In  asbestos-exposed  patients, other  more  frequent  variables  were  cigarette  smoking, male  predominance, older  age, respiratory  and  cardiological  pathologies, and  history  of  diabetes [7].  Currently, the  study  of  association  between  exogenous-agent-inhalation  exposure  and  the  COVID-19  severity  has  been  concentrated  on  environmental  contamination [9].  Approximately, 92 %  of  the  US  Lincoln  county  population  with  asbestos  exposure  and  chronic  pulmonary  diseases  had  been  protected  from  COVID-19  infection  or  comorbidity  by  proactive  and  cooperative  participation  of  their  residents  with  unknown  asbestosis  situation  and  severity  in  the  period  of  COVID-19  pandemic [8].        

 

Conclusion

The  detection  of  an  independent  relation  in  small  sample  of  subjects  may  be  precluded  by  confounding  covariables, such  as  smokers, having  more  comorbidity, more  frequently  male, and  older  age.  In  occupational  asbestos  exposure, respiratory  support  was  required  higher, compared  to  unexposed-asbestos  patients.  Proactive  and cooperative  participation  can  protect  people  with  asbestos  exposure  from  COVID-19  comorbidity.   

 

Authors Contributions

Dr. Attapon  Cheepsattayakorn  conducted  the  study  framework  and  wrote  the  manuscript.  Associate  Professor  Dr. Ruangrong  Cheepsattayakorn  and  Professor  Dr. Porntep  Siriwanarangsun  contributed  to  scientific  content  and  assistance  in  manuscript  writing.  All  authors  read  and  approved  the  final  version  of  the  manuscript.

Competing  Interests: The  authors  declare  that  they  have  no  actual  or  potential  competing  financial  interests. 

Funding  Sources: The  authors  disclose  no  funding  sources.   

 

References

1.American  Thoracic  Society (ATS).  Diagnosis  and  initial  management  of  nonmalignant  diseases  related  to  asbestos.  The  official  statement  of  the  American  Thoracic  Society, adopted  by  the  ATS  Board  of  Directors  on  December  12, 2003.     

2.Azadeh  N, Limper  AH, Carmona  EM, Ryu  JH.  The  role  of  infection  in  interstitial  lung  diseases : a  review.  Chest  2017; 152 : 842-852.  DOI : 10.1016/j.chest.2017.03.033 

3.Drake  TM, Docherty  AB, Harrison  EM, Quint  JK, Adamali  H, Agnew  S, et  al.  Outcome  of  hospitalization  for  COVID-19  in  patients  with  interstitial  lung  disease : an  international  multicenter  study.  Am  J  Respir  Crit  Care  Med  2020; 202 : 1656-1665. DOI : 10.1164/rccm.202007-2794OC 

4.Ouyang  L, Gong  J, Yu  M.  Pre-existing  interstitial  lung  disease  in  patients  with  coronavirus  disease  219 : a  meta-analysis.  Int  Immunopharmacol  2021; 100 : 108145. DOI : 10.1016/j.intimp.2021.108145 

5.Roggli  VL, Gibbs  AR, Attanoos  R, Churg  A, Popper  H, Cagle  P, et  al.  Pathology  of  asbestosis-an  update  of  the  diagnostic  criteria.  Arch  Pathol  Lab  Med  2010; 134 (3):462-480.  DOI: 10.5858/134.3.462.

6.Fazzo  L, Grande  E, Zona  A, Minelli  G, Crialesi  R, Lavarone  I, et  al.  Mortality rates  from  asbestos-related  diseases  in  Italy  during  the  first  year  of  the  COVID-19  pandemic.  Frontiers  in  Public  Health  2024.  Published  on  January  16, 2024.  DOI : 10.3389/fpubh.2023.1243261 

7.Granados  G, Sa?ez-Lo?pez  M, Aljama  C, Sampol  J, Cruz  M-J, Ferrer  J, et  al.  Asbestos  exposure  and  severity  of  COVID-19.  International  Journal  of  Environmental  Research  and  Public  Health  2022; 19 : 16305.DOI : https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316305 

8.McNew  T, Morrissette  KL, Black  B.  Controlling  COVID-19  in  an  asbestos-exposed  population.  Chest  2021  annual  meeting.  October  17-20, 2021.  1927A.
9.Wu  X, Nethery  RC, Sabath  MB, Braun  D, Dominici  F.  Air  pollution  and  COVID-19  mortality  in  the  United  States : strengths  and  limitations  of  an  ecological  regression  analysis.  Si  Adv  2020; 6 : eabd4049. 

Figure 1

cara jackpot mahjong wins rtp mahjong vs bandito rtp mahjong ways 2 rtp pgsoft booming slot luar terpercaya slot server jp cara menang aztec gems slot gacor olympus taktik rahasia maxwin mahjong teknik pancing scatter olympus trik menang mahjong pragmatic kejutan besar slot mahjong trik menang gampang pragmatic play algoritma slot zeus slot server kamboja mahjong scatter naga hitam perkalian slot sugar rush rtp fortune tiger slot genie wishes scatter slot zeus rtp slot mahjong ways pola gacor mahjong pgsoft perkalian besar mahjong pgsoft